RESEARCH ARTICLE


Are the Condition, Growth and Diet of Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) Different between the Three Major Basins of Lake George, New York?



Brett D. D’Arco, Jeremy L. Farrell, Sandra A. Nierzwicki-Bauer*, Charles W. Boylen
Darrin Fresh Water Institute and Department of Biological Sciences, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 5060 Lake Shore Dr., Bolton Landing, NY 12814, USA.


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© 2015 D’Arco et al.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Darrin Fresh Water Institute and Department of Biological Sciences, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 5060 Lake Shore Dr., Bolton Landing, NY 12814, USA; Tel: 518 644-3541; Fax: 518 644-3640; E-mail: nierzs@rpi.edu


Abstract

Gill netting was carried out at 25 sites in Lake George, New York to determine if interbasin differences of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) exist. Fish relative weight, growth and diet were analyzed for 267 yellow perch. Yellow perch are known to be omnivorous in the lake eating zooplankton, benthos and small fishes in both the littoral and pelagic waters. The length-weight relationship exhibited a significant difference amongst the Narrows, North and South basins for condition constants (p < 0.05). Relative weights were consistently found to be below the general target range and had significant differences between the basins. Growth models of fish caught in the three basins showed variation in growth of yellow perch. The yellow perch from the North basin exhibited allometric growth, while those in the South and Narrows displayed isometric growth. The diets of yellow perch between the basins also were found to be different. Previous studies have noted differences between the basins with respect to chlorophyll a, chemistry, and biota. This study provides evidence of differences in the fishery amongst the basins that follow similar, previously defined, differences in chemistry.

Keywords: Age, diet, growth, length-weight relationship, relative weight, yellow perch.