RESEARCH ARTICLE


Are the Ugly Truths Not Ugly Enough?



James H. Cowan
Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, 70803


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© 2009 James H. Cowan

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode). This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, 70803; Tel: 225 578-9400; Fax: 225 578-6513; E-mail: jhcowan@lsu.edu


Abstract

In recent years there has been an increase in the number of papers, many of which have been published in high profile journals, that address real environmental or ecological problems, but with flawed, subjective, and frequently hyperbolic arguments. I identify two such examples from the US Gulf of Mexico, linked by their focus on fisheries resources as the cause de jour, to illustrate the problem and express my concerns. If this trend continues, we should not be surprised when managers and policy makers who need objective, defensible, scientific answers no longer solicit our inputs.